Everything About Robotic Total Knee Replacement and its Treatment

A robotic knee replacement is similar to a standard knee replacement in that it replaces the knee joint. Damaged tissue in your knee is removed and replaced with an artificial joint by your surgeon. The only difference is that it's made with the help of a robotic arm.

What is Robotic Radical Prostatectomy?

A minimally invasive procedure known as a robotic radical prostatectomy removes the entire prostate that has cancer using a surgical robotic device. By putting tiny robotic instruments through numerous extremely small keyhole incisions in the patient's abdomen, the surgeon is able to accurately remove the prostate and surrounding tissues thanks to the revolutionary surgical technology. This treatment is far less invasive than a conventional radical retropubic prostatectomy, which necessitates an abdominal incision that extends from the belly button to the pubic bone.

What is Robotic Radical Prostatectomy?

A minimally invasive procedure known as a robotic radical prostatectomy removes the entire prostate that has cancer using a surgical robotic device. By putting tiny robotic instruments through numerous extremely small keyhole incisions in the patient's abdomen, the surgeon is able to accurately remove the prostate and surrounding tissues thanks to the revolutionary surgical technology. This treatment is far less invasive than a conventional radical retropubic prostatectomy, which necessitates an abdominal incision that extends from the belly button to the pubic bone.

Who Needs Robotic Radical Prostatectomy?

The majority of men with prostate cancer are eligible for robotic surgery, but only you and your surgeon can decide which prostate cancer treatment is best for you. When your prostate cancer is in state T1 or T2, robotic radical prostatectomy typically yields the greatest results (meaning that it is confined to your prostate). There is no cutoff, though, and many individuals do benefit from the operation even when their cancer is in a more advanced stage.

Recovery Rate

Robotic radical prostatectomy uses more precise incisions and helps achieve optimal positioning, which may lead to a better and faster recovery. After your surgery, your surgeon and the rest of your care team will monitor your progress, help to relieve discomfort, and chart a course for your at-home recovery.

Who Needs Robotic Radical Prostatectomy?

The majority of men with prostate cancer are eligible for robotic surgery, but only you and your surgeon can decide which prostate cancer treatment is best for you. When your prostate cancer is in state T1 or T2, robotic radical prostatectomy typically yields the greatest results (meaning that it is confined to your prostate). There is no cutoff, though, and many individuals do benefit from the operation even when their cancer is in a more advanced stage

Recovery Rate

Robotic radical prostatectomy uses more precise incisions and helps achieve optimal positioning, which may lead to a better and faster recovery. After your surgery, your surgeon and the rest of your care team will monitor your progress, help to relieve discomfort, and chart a course for your at-home recovery.

Symptoms

However, early patient-reported symptoms have not been thoroughly described. Many patients will experience symptoms in the first few days following radical prostatectomy (RP). Our goal was to show the relationship between severe symptoms and postoperative complications as well as the pattern of symptoms that follow RP.

Causes

  • Inflammatory joint disease(e.g infection gout, rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Obesity
  • Older age 
  • Previous knee injury

Symptoms

However, early patient-reported symptoms have not been thoroughly described. Many patients will experience symptoms in the first few days following radical prostatectomy (RP). Our goal was to show the relationship between severe symptoms and postoperative complications as well as the pattern of symptoms that follow RP.

Symptoms

  • However, early patient-reported symptoms have not been thoroughly described. Many patients will experience symptoms in the first few days following radical prostatectomy (RP). Our goal was to show the relationship between severe symptoms and postoperative complications as well as the pattern of symptoms that follow RP.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Risks & Complications

Risks & Complications

Advantage of Robotic Prostatectomy

Advantage of Robotic Prostatectomy

When to consult a doctor ?

Consult your specialist as soon as you experience :

This are the symptoms of robotic radical prostatectomy

  • Difficulty in beginning to urinate.
  • sluggish (protracted) urinating
  • Increased frequency of nighttime urination.
  • Urinating repeatedly, stopping and starting.
  • The sensation that your bladder is somewhat empty.
  • Infection in the urinary tract.
  • Being unable to urinate.

Our Specialist

When to consult a doctor ?

Consult your Specialist as soon as you experience :

  • This are the symptoms of robotic radical prostatectomy

    • Difficulty in beginning to urinate.
    • sluggish (protracted) urinating
    • Increased frequency of nighttime urination.
    • Urinating repeatedly, stopping and starting.
    • The sensation that your bladder is somewhat empty.
    • Infection in the urinary tract.
    • Being unable to urinate.

Our Orthopedician Specialist

***

Insurance coverage

Insurance does cover the cost of the surgical procedure for a hysterectomy performed due to adenomyosis because it is on the list of procedures that are "medically required." The cost capping, however, may change from instance to case. Please get your healthcare or insurance company to validate this.

Insurance coverage

Insurance does cover the cost of the surgical procedure for a hysterectomy performed due to adenomyosis because it is on the list of procedures that are "medically required." The cost capping, however, may change from instance to case. Please get your healthcare or insurance company to validate this.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What type of patients are candidates for robotic prostatectomy?

    Patients with clinically localised prostate cancer are treated with a robotic laparoscopic prostatectomy. The vast majority of patients who qualify for an open radical prostatectomy also make great candidates for the robotic procedure. The robotic technique is the surgical therapy strategy of choice at many centres, including the University of Florida, for clinically localised prostate cancer.

  • what patients are not considered good candidates for the robotic technique?

    Even though it happens very seldom, conversion to open surgery can be necessary if the robotic method encounters problems with dissection or significant bleeding. Our doctors are skilled in both openRobotic prostatectomy may not be the ideal option for patients with a history of major abdominal surgery, radiation, underlying heart or lung illness, morbid obesity, or bleeding tendencies. Robotic prostatectomy is not an option for patients with known metastatic or recurring prostate cancer. Although patients with extremely big prostate glands (e.g., > 100 grammes) are still eligible for robotic prostatectomy, the procedure typically takes longer than it does for people with lesser prostate gland sizes. and laparoscopic procedures, as well as robotic surgery, so they are prepared to complete the procedure either way, if necessary.

  • What does place if difficulties emerge and open surgery is necessary?

    Even though it happens very seldom, conversion to open surgery can be necessary if the robotic method encounters problems with dissection or significant bleeding. Our doctors are skilled in both open and laparoscopic procedures, as well as robotic surgery, so they are prepared to complete the procedure either way, if necessary.

  • What percentage of robotic prostatectomy patients report overall success with regard to potency and continence?

    Following a prostatectomy, the extent and timing of the recovery of sexual function and continence is a complicated process that depends on numerous factors throughout time. Age, preoperative sexual and urogenital function, and the existence of medical diseases including diabetes and hypertension are some of the patient characteristics that affect the success of returning these quality-of-life difficulties. Additionally, surgical elements like the degree and scope of nerve preservation can affect results.

    At 6 and 12 months, respectively, 73% and 88% of young patients (60 years old), who were preoperatively potent and had no urinary problems, were continent (defined as 0-1 security pad), and 87% and 93% were potent (defined as having the ability to engage in intercourse with or without the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitor medications). The degree of the malignancy, the patient's age, and any coexisting illnesses can all have a substantial impact on these outcomes. Please refer to the graphs of results for potency and continence above.

  • Frequently Asked Questions

  • What type of patients are candidates for robotic prostatectomy?
    Patients with clinically localised prostate cancer are treated with a robotic laparoscopic prostatectomy. The vast majority of patients who qualify for an open radical prostatectomy also make great candidates for the robotic procedure. The robotic technique is the surgical therapy strategy of choice at many centres, including the University of Florida, for clinically localised prostate cancer.
  • what patients are not considered good candidates for the robotic technique?
    Even though it happens very seldom, conversion to open surgery can be necessary if the robotic method encounters problems with dissection or significant bleeding. Our doctors are skilled in both openRobotic prostatectomy may not be the ideal option for patients with a history of major abdominal surgery, radiation, underlying heart or lung illness, morbid obesity, or bleeding tendencies. Robotic prostatectomy is not an option for patients with known metastatic or recurring prostate cancer. Although patients with extremely big prostate glands (e.g., > 100 grammes) are still eligible for robotic prostatectomy, the procedure typically takes longer than it does for people with lesser prostate gland sizes. and laparoscopic procedures, as well as robotic surgery, so they are prepared to complete the procedure either way, if necessary.
  • What does place if difficulties emerge and open surgery is necessary?
     

    Even though it happens very seldom, conversion to open surgery can be necessary if the robotic method encounters problems with dissection or significant bleeding. Our doctors are skilled in both open and laparoscopic procedures, as well as robotic surgery, so they are prepared to complete the procedure either way, if necessary.

  • What percentage of robotic prostatectomy patients report overall success with regard to potency and continence?
    Following a prostatectomy, the extent and timing of the recovery of sexual function and continence is a complicated process that depends on numerous factors throughout time. Age, preoperative sexual and urogenital function, and the existence of medical diseases including diabetes and hypertension are some of the patient characteristics that affect the success of returning these quality-of-life difficulties. Additionally, surgical elements like the degree and scope of nerve preservation can affect results.

    At 6 and 12 months, respectively, 73% and 88% of young patients (60 years old), who were preoperatively potent and had no urinary problems, were continent (defined as 0-1 security pad), and 87% and 93% were potent (defined as having the ability to engage in intercourse with or without the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitor medications). The degree of the malignancy, the patient's age, and any coexisting illnesses can all have a substantial impact on these outcomes. Please refer to the graphs of results for potency and continence above.